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Digital Media Receivers Reviews: Are You Still Paying for Cable TV?

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TV and bookcase: Digital Media Receivers ReviewsTired of paying $80+/ month for cable television? Digital media receivers, are set top boxes that you can hook up to your TV to stream shows and movies from providers such as Hulu, Amazon, Netflix and others. They are becoming more reliable, readily available and affordable. The problem is that there’s so many on the market now, and they all differ in their functionality, service offerings and compatibility. Should you get a media receiver, and if so, which one?

Why Would I Want a Media Receiver?

As you’ve probably noticed, most network content providers (ABC, CBS, CNN, CW, FOX, MTV, Food Network, Bravo, etc.) are offering their content online, so you can stream and watch full episodes of shows you may have missed or forgotten to record. Some networks stream the shows from their websites directly (ie. “Survivor” episodes can be viewed on CBS.com), and others offer their content through aggregate networks such as Hulu.com, that have signed contracts with certain network providers.

The drawback, of course, is that watching TV shows on your PC isn’t quite as comfortable as kicking back on your couch and watching them on your television. And not everyone is savvy enough to know how to hookup their laptop to their television set (and even for those that do, the interface is not as slick as with a dedicated media receiver, nor do you usually have access to a remote).

This is where the digital media receiver (DMR) (also known as media receiver, media extender, digital media adapter (DMA), media player, network media player, stream media player, multimedia player, media server, etc.) comes into play. Media receivers are set top boxes that you plug into your television set or projector. They are preloaded with software that organizes and streams TV shows and movies based on some of the network service providers mentioned above.

Media receivers are gaining more attention as people are realizing they can get most or all of their favorite TV shows and movies either for free (with advertisements), or on a per-show or season pass basis (costs range from $0.99 and up for a show to $10+ for a season pass). Only in the 5 years or so have these boxes become reliable enough to offer a service that can compete with cable television providers, which is why cable TV companies are sweating the big one right now, and losing subscribers at an unprecedented rate.

Does a Media Receiver Offer Everything My Cable Service Does?

A media receiver offers access to pre-recorded tv shows and movies. Here are some of the pros and cons of a typical media receiver:

Pros

Cons

  • HD access to full episodes of popular TV shows and movies
  • Instant streaming or download access (no more scheduling recording)
  • No more worrying about losing DVR recordings every few years (DVRs aren’t meant to last forever and they all fair eventually)
  • Watch shows when you want
  • Many are compact enough that you can travel with them (catch up on your shows in the hotel)
  • Typically less expensive than cable depending on how many services you subscribe to
  • Some episodes aren’t available until 24 hours after the original air date
  • Not all media receivers offer access to the same services
  • Content providers like Hulu and Amazon don’t always provide full access to episodes for some shows
  • Accessing sports isn’t as easy because you may need a subscription to specific networks

What About Live TV?

The major drawback with media receivers is that most of them don’t include a digital tuner or antenna, which is what’s needed to process and view television signals broadcast over the air. However, with the cost of a month or two of your cable subscription, you can purchase and add these to your setup. They will let you watch live TV, in HD (depending on where you live), from network providers such as ABC, CBS, PBS, CNN, CW, FOX and others.

What Channels Will I Get in My Area?

You can visit the FCC.gov website to find out what channels you’ll get in your area, and how strong the signal is you’ll receive. Depending on the type of antenna you purchase, you’ll be able to receive more or less of these channels.

Here’s some antennas we recommend, based on varying budgets.

Indoor Antennas

  • Terk Amplified HDTV Antenna – Of all the antennas we checked out, this appears to be one of the best. You’ll typically receive quite a few more stations, in good HD quality, compared to a basic antenna.
  • Basic Indoor AntennaShould get you most of the stations you need, assuming your FCC reception report above shows that you are in an area with good reception (and not surrounded by tall building or trees).

What is the Best Digital Media Receiver?

Now that you have a fair grasp of how digital media receivers work, and how you might be able to view live TV as well as all your favorite shows and movies, in HD, without having to pay $80+/ month to your cable provider, the question begs: which one to get? Read our media receiver duke out: Apple TV vs Google TV vs Boxee vs Roku vs WD TV vs PlayOn vs TVersity for the juicy details.

Do you use a streaming media player in your home?

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4 Comments on "Digital Media Receivers Reviews: Are You Still Paying for Cable TV?"

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gadgetry geek
gadgetry geek

I have to say that the assortment of digital media receivers is getting better, and they’re offering more and more solid content. But the lack of quality sports coverage/ support (the closest equivalent on a media receiver besides the NBA or NHL channels is PlayON ESPN3, which barely works) makes me lean towards cable tv. And with all the on demand/ VOD channels on direcTV now I can’t imagine it will be long before the cable tv’s become viable competitors in the online/ on demand space again?

Goat
Goat

The other poster works for the cable company.

xbox fan
xbox fan

Why wasn’t the XBox 360 included in this list? The PS3 was?

Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

Hello, I’m sorry but I’m a little confused. The XBox 360 is mentioned in this article and the PS3 is not mentioned. Did you mean the Best Media Streaming article?

Thank you,

Kimberly

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